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Correctness 

This is a reminder that vocabulary changes. I grew up in the 90's, and it was common to call things re*arded.

I missed the memo 10 years ago and said something was that around a friend's teenage kid. The kid looked aghast and mentioned nobody says that anymore.

You know what? The kid was right. I adjusted and dropped that word from my vocabulary.

Don't blame the kid, or call them PC when this happens to you. Re-examine yourself. Trust me, as you get older it'll happen to you.

Correctness 

Tldr; We all have blinders, and can fall into traps of using hurtful words because they're what you learned to be normal.

What's key is you accept criticism, and adjust.

@kallisti5 of course you'd have the Current Thing™ flag, of course

Labelling *people* as retarded (as opposed to the accepted usage-e.g. fire retardant) is an insult to people who are mentally ill, who were (in the past) all assumed to be stupid (by pseudoscientists); as such, referring to stupidity as retardation implies that all mentally ill people are stupid.

But, on the other hand: the shift in usage to mean "stupid" also coincides with it *not* being used to refer to mental illness, so...

I've thought a bit on it, don't have an answer. Language is hard.

@pixelherodev language is hard. What spurred this post was something my elderly mom kept saying, I finally had to correct her that it was a term people really didn't use anymore.

It really hit me that every generation goes through the loss of words, either because they're (un-)purposefully hurtful, or generally out of style.

Either you adapt, or you grow increasingly out of touch with the generations that come after you.

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